GARDEN HOUSES WITH FLAIR THE CONSERVATORIES

The historic conservatories, which underwent restoration up to 2018, appear again as they did when they were first built. The three conservatories correspond to three climate zones. The plantings are based on original records, so that visitors to the conservatories experience them as they were in the second half of the 19th century.

Karlsruhe Botanical Gardens, summer exhibition

2018 summer exhibition in the camellia and succulent house.

THE CAMELLIA AND SUCCULENT HOUSE

Originally the cold house, this conservatory now houses both plants from arid climates–cacti and succulents–as well as cultured early blooming potted plants, such as camellias, azaleas and viburnum. The latter were common in 19th-century plant collections. In winter months, this house also contains special trees from the Karlsruhe orangery. In the summer, it serves as an exhibition space for art created by students at the State Academy of Fine Arts Karlsruhe.

Camellia and succulent house.

Karlsruhe Botanical Gardens, palm house

The palm house.

THE PALM HOUSE

The palm house, the middle conservatory, is the focal point of the horticultural collection. It stands the tallest, high enough to accommodate the palms for which it is named. Cycads and giant bamboo also thrive here. Especially in the winter and spring it holds countless colorful blossoms to marvel at. Birds-of-paradise flowers also grow here. The giant-leafed Victoria water lily flourishes in a pond.

Water lily pond in the palm house.

THE HOTHOUSE OR TROPICAL HOUSE

This place is warm and humid. Jack in the pulpit, bromeliads and orchids, in particular, enjoy this climate. The botanical gardens had a hothouse even in its early years. The historically varied tree population, including allspice, coffee and breadnut trees, is being rebuilt to its documented variety.

Impressions from the hothouse or tropical house.

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